GOLD FEVER San Francisco 1851

 

INTRODUCTION AN INTERVIEW WITH KEN SALTER

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Pierre Dubois and his sexy girlfriend, Manon, sail on the American Clipper, Flying Cloud, for San Francisco at the height of the Gold Rush — Dubois tasked to prove mining society fraud and Manon to open a restaurant French law won’t allow a woman to own. With most of the easy to mine gold gone and boatloads of new gold seekers arriving weekly, San Francisco is a lawless, raucous, dangerous place in 1851, where quarrels are settled by a gun, men outnumber women 100-1, and crooks rule the streets, bordellos, and gambling palaces. Dubois’ and Manon’s odyssey lead them through Little China’s opium dens, brothels, and gambling lairs, Little Italy’s charming trattorias, and on to the gold fields of the Yuba River where American and foreign miners compete in hostile conditions with each other for the rare chance to strike it rich. After the City is torched by the predatory Sydney Ducks gang and a Committee of Vigilance seeks to hang them, Pierre and Manon must make their way and earn their keep or return home defeated and impoverished like most who risked life, health and family debt for a dream of riches. “GOLD FEVER is a deftly written historical novel ... in which the author, Ken Salter, pays close attention to getting the background details right. The result is a riveting, entertaining novel from first page to last. Very highly recommended reading.” — The Midwest Book Review "a well-researched novel about the California Gold Rush. The author blends into his narrative the gold mining challenges faced by the men who searched for the precious mineral. ... If you are interested in understanding the history the the California Gold Rush ... you [will] enjoy this book." — Historical Novel Society "GOLD FEVER depicts in vivid detail the plight of new immigrants, women and scounderels in the Gold Rush." — Annick Foucrier Professor of North American History at the University of Paris, the Sorbonne, and Director of the Center for North American Research